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Teaching Financial Literacy to High School Students

Teaching Financial Literacy to High School Students 2018-07-28T12:20:59+00:00

8 Steps for Teaching Financial Literacy to High School Students

If you’re interested in teaching financial literacy to high school students, you’ve come to the right place. Here you’ll find eight steps in the process of building a financial education program for teens, and the resources to back them up.

Achieve Maximum Results while Teaching Financial Literacy in High School

Planning for Teaching Financial Literacy To High School Students Infographic

1. How to Teach Financial Literacy to High School Students: 8 Phases

The resources available here are designed to support teaching financial literacy to high school students. The following example illustrates how the materials can help define and organize a program.

Stan Bayless was a volunteer at the Boys & Girls Club in a midwestern city. He was excited about the idea of teaching financial literacy to high school students, but didn’t have any background in finance or education. As a volunteer, Stan worked with high school kids a lot, so he was familiar with his audience; he knew he wanted to bring financial literacy training to a small group of about 10 teenagers who frequently stopped in at the after-school program at the Boys & Girls Club. These kids mainly came from low-income families in the inner city. Stan just needed to know the money management skills that would best support them toward positive futures. Mr. Bayless interviewed a few of the kids he wanted to reach in a small, informal group one afternoon at the club, and found out they were most interested in learning about ways to earn income and prepare for college.

Composition of Teaching Financial Literacy To High School Students Options

Infographic of Teaching Financial Literacy To High School Students Outcomes

2. Knowing your Learners: Part One of Teaching Financial Literacy to High School Students

Mr. Bayless’s first objective for teaching financial literacy in high school was to conduct one after-school training with 10 students at the Boys & Girls Club and see how it went. His long-term vision, though, was to make the program sustainable – maybe having monthly lessons throughout the school year. For the initial training, Stan made it his goal to help students get to the Apply level on Bloom’s Taxonomy – that is, being able to use knowledge and apply it practically – on a couple of financial literacy topics relevant to them.

3. Your Goals are Clear: Now How will You Teach, and at What Pace?

Stan was clear about his short-term objectives for teaching financial literacy to high school students and what he wanted to achieve in the long run. Next, he had to decide on his delivery mode. He decided that, since his target audience was low-income inner-city kids, he would let them complete at least some activities at their own pace. So, in addition to doing live in-person instruction at the club, he wanted to give the students some technology-based elements they could do on their own time, to keep them interested and engaged.

Arrangement of Teaching Financial Literacy To High School Students Procedures

Strategies for Teaching Financial Literacy To High School Students Expertise

4. Process of How to Teach Financial Literacy to High School Students Entails Subject Matter Selection

Stan’s next task for teaching financial literacy in high school was to identify the topics he wanted to present in the class. Making this decision was easy, because the kids already had told him their preference to learn about earning income and getting financially prepared for college. Based on those needs, Mr. Bayless decided he could best meet his goal of giving students knowledge they could immediately put into action by focusing on budgeting and career planning.

5. Educator Qualifications, Skills of Engagement are Essential

The next step was for Stan to locate a qualified educator who already knew how to teach financial literacy to high school students. He needed someone who had demonstrated skill in both content knowledge and education. As a Boys & Girls Club volunteer, Mr. Bayless felt confident that he could talk to the students effectively, but didn’t know much about financial education. Fortunately, he found a financial professional with an office nearby who was certified through the NFEC’s CFEI program, and this professional offered to teach one class pro bono. Stan would prepare the materials and assist.

Planning for Teaching Financial Literacy To High School Students Management

Structure Teaching Financial Literacy To High School Students Processes

6. Teaching Financial Literacy to High School Students: Next Step, Deciding on Lesson Plans

To best meet the students’ needs and the learner outcomes he desired for teaching financial literacy to high school students, Stan was looking for a financial literacy lessons plans for high school students with practical, action-based lessons. He also wanted something that would keep the kids interested while they learned. Stan accomplished this by choosing curriculum with engaging, interactive activities they could complete at their own pace.

7. How Many? How Much? Measuring Program Impact

Out of the 10 kids Mr. Bayless invited to the after-school program, 8 showed up; they showed average improvement of 20% on a short financial literacy test after completing the training. Stan was encouraged that he had learned a lot about how to teach financial literacy to high school students. Stan compiled the data into a report that he showed to his volunteer coordinator, and also sent in a press release to the city newspapers. He knew reporting was important, because showing program impact could help him raise funds to support the series of trainings he hoped to host in the future.

Blueprints of Teaching Financial Literacy To High School Students Infographic

8. Your Work Has Just Begun: Teaching Financial Literacy in High School Includes Ongoing Reinforcement

After the first effort for teaching financial literacy to high school students was over, Stan’s work had just begun. He realized that he needed to help the students apply what they’d learned, so they wouldn’t forget the lessons. To recognize their accomplishments after the workshop, he gave each of them a personalized note thanking them for attending and congratulating them on their achievement. Then Stan set up a follow-up system where he emailed interactive financial education activities to the student participants every month for six months. These activities were designed to help them put the lessons into practice and hone their knowledge into life skills.

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