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Personal Finance Books 2016-12-23T12:55:12-08:00

NFEC Offers Prime Examples of Personal Finance Books

Personal Finance Books

There are lots of reasons why people look forward to retirement. When we close our eyes and daydream about the long-term future, what kind of lifestyle do we see? That’s one of the exercises set forth in the National Financial Educators Council’s personal finance books that guide people in retirement planning. As part of the Road to Retirement series, the NFEC has developed financial literacy books, online resources, classroom-based curricula, and keynote presentations.

The Road to Retirement financial education book, designed for any age group, leads students toward a state of financial wellness regardless of where they start. This book begins with the daydreaming exercise. Here are some of the common reasons people who take this personal finance class have stated for enjoying retirement:

  • Being able to live their desired lifestyle.
  • Working at something they love and are passionate about.
  • Taking care of family.
  • Feeling secure.
  • Being free from the worry and stress of having bills and debt.
  • Making a difference in the world.
  • Purchasing fun things like toys and travel.

These are fun daydreams to have. However, if people don’t get their mindset about personal finance into a positive state, they will never be able to retire. The NFEC’s introductory activity in the Road to Retirement personal finance class has students define how they want to spend their retirement. They suggest including any thoughts about family relationships, physical health, charitable giving, fun and travel, spirituality, hobbies, and career.

After this activity is complete, Road to Retirement leads participants to set goals for their financial wellbeing to achieve their plans for spending retirement. Using the S.M.A.R.T. guidelines, they create written goals that are realistic, specific, and achievable. Goal-setting is important because it builds motivation and helps define one’s spending vs. savings habits.

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